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Stallerhof


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AT: Farmyard A: Franz Xaver Kroetz Pf: 1972, Hamburg Pb: 1971 Tr: 1976 G: Drama in 3 acts; German prose S: Farm and fairground, Bavaria, c.1970 C: 2m, 2fBeppi is the mentally retarded teenage daughter of farmer Staller and his wife. She is seen first haltingly reading a postcard from her aunt. Her mother hits her when she gets a word wrong, and when Beppi triumphantly finishes her reading, is ordered to dry the dishes. There is little warmth in the family, and the only friendship Beppi finds is with the hired farm-hand Sepp, a man in his fifties. While Beppi milks a cow and he shovels manure, he tells her a romantic story about a white Captain who ‘rescues’ an Indian maiden. He takes Beppi to a fair. When she soils her knickers after a ride on the ghost train, he cleans her up and uses the opportunity to have sex with her. When Beppi becomes pregnant and admits who the father is, her father shoots Sepp's dog and sends Sepp away. The parents decide that Beppi must have an abortion. The mother makes preparations and gets Beppi to strip naked. At the last moment, however, the mother relents, the only time she shows compassion towards her daughter. The play ends with Beppi in labour, crying out for her mother and father.

AT: Farmyard A: Franz Xaver Kroetz Pf: 1972, Hamburg Pb: 1971 Tr: 1976 G: Drama in 3 acts; German prose S: Farm and fairground, Bavaria, c.1970 C: 2m, 2f

Kroetz wrote a number of ultra-realistic and desolate plays, of which Stallerhof is the best known. His first play Work at Home (1971), depicting an attempted abortion with a knitting needle, provoked riots in Munich. His recurrent theme is the inability of the working classes, whether urban or rural, to articulate, and this is portrayed in their use of cliché and in long passages of silence.

Subjects: Literary Studies (Plays and Playwrights).


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