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Statement of Terms of Employment


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Not later than two months after the beginning of employment, an employer must give to every employee a written statement setting out the following information: the names of employer and employee; the date employment began; the date when the employee's continuous employment began; the scale or rate of remuneration or method of calculating remuneration; the intervals at which remuneration is paid; the hours of work; the holiday entitlement (which must be sufficiently specific to allow the employee's holiday entitlement to be precisely calculated); the procedure to be adopted in the event of incapacity for work as a result of sickness or injury (including sick pay provisions, if any); pensions and pension schemes; the length of notice the employee is obliged to give and entitled to receive to terminate the contract; the title of the job the employee is employed to do or, as an alternative to the job title, a brief description of the work; if the employment is not intended to be permanent, the period for which it is expected to continue or, if it is for a fixed term, the date it is intended to end; either the place of work or, if the employee is required to work at various places, an indication that this is the case; any collective bargaining agreements that directly affect the terms and conditions of employment.Where there are no particulars to be given (for example, if there is no pension scheme), this must be indicated.

the names of employer and employee;

the date employment began;

the date when the employee's continuous employment began;

the scale or rate of remuneration or method of calculating remuneration;

the intervals at which remuneration is paid;

the hours of work;

the holiday entitlement (which must be sufficiently specific to allow the employee's holiday entitlement to be precisely calculated);

the procedure to be adopted in the event of incapacity for work as a result of sickness or injury (including sick pay provisions, if any);

pensions and pension schemes;

the length of notice the employee is obliged to give and entitled to receive to terminate the contract;

the title of the job the employee is employed to do or, as an alternative to the job title, a brief description of the work;

if the employment is not intended to be permanent, the period for which it is expected to continue or, if it is for a fixed term, the date it is intended to end;

either the place of work or, if the employee is required to work at various places, an indication that this is the case;

any collective bargaining agreements that directly affect the terms and conditions of employment.

If the employee is required to work outside the UK for more than one month there is a requirement for additional information to be given relating to the length of the period of this employment, the currency in which remuneration is to be paid in that period, details of additional remuneration or benefits connected with working outside the UK, and the repatriation arrangements.

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Subjects: Business and Management — Law.


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