Overview

stomatal conductance


'stomatal conductance' can also refer to...

stomatal conductance

stomatal conductance

Smaller, faster stomata: scaling of stomatal size, rate of response, and stomatal conductance

The coupled response of stomatal conductance to photosynthesis and transpiration

Stomatal control and hydraulic conductance, with special reference to tall trees

Regulation of stomatal conductance and transpiration in forest canopies

Chilling responses of maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings: root hydraulic conductance, abscisic acid, and stomatal conductance

Pore size regulates operating stomatal conductance, while stomatal densities drive the partitioning of conductance between leaf sides

Stomatal Conductance of Lettuce Grown Under or Exposed to Different Light Qualities

A Coupled Model of Photosynthesis, Stomatal Conductance and Transpiration for a Rose Leaf (Rosa hybrida L.)

Stomatal conductance does not correlate with photosynthetic capacity in transgenic tobacco with reduced amounts of Rubisco

Co-ordination of hydraulic and stomatal conductances across light qualities in cucumber leaves

Stomatal conductance predicts yields in irrigated Pima cotton and bread wheat grown at high temperatures

The dependence of leaf hydraulic conductance on irradiance during HPFM measurements: any role for stomatal response?

Mycorrhizal influence on hydraulic and hormonal factors implicated in the control of stomatal conductance during drought

Hydraulic and chemical signalling in the control of stomatal conductance and transpiration

Nocturnal and daytime stomatal conductance respond to root-zone temperature in ‘Shiraz’ grapevines

Nighttime stomatal conductance differs with nutrient availability in two temperate floodplain tree species

Effects of CO2on Stomatal Conductance: Do Stomata Open at Very High CO2Concentrations?

 

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Quick Reference

The rate at which water vapour passes through the stomata of a plant per unit leaf area, typically measured in millimoles per square metre per second. It varies between plants, depending on the distribution density, size, and pore thickness of the stomata, and in the same plant over time according to the difference in vapour pressure between the inside of the plant and the external environment and the degree of opening of the stomatal pores.

Subjects: Biological Sciences.


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