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St. Petersburg Declaration


'St. Petersburg Declaration' can also refer to...

St. Petersburg Declaration

St. Petersburg, Declaration of

Declaration between the Emperor and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 18(29) March 1737

Declaration between Courland and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 8 August 1762

Telegraph Declaration between Germany and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 27 January (8 February) 1877

Telegraph Declaration between Germany and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 20 June (2 July) 1880

Telegraph Declaration between Germany and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 13(25) March 1872

Declaration between Russia and Sweden respecting Tonnage Measurement, signed at St. Petersburg, 27 June 1907

Declaration between Norway and Russia respecting Tonnage Measurement, signed at St. Petersburg, 10 August 1901

Declaration between Germany and Russia respecting Tonnage Measurement, signed at St. Petersburg, 1 March 1902

Declaration between Norway and Russia respecting Commissions Rogatory, signed at St. Petersburg, 26 March 1903

Declaration between Germany and Russia relative to Tonnage Measurement, signed at St. Petersburg, 6 July 1898

Supplementary Commercial and Customs Declaration between Persia and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 29 December 1904

Declaration between Denmark and Russia respecting Tonnage Measurement, signed at St. Petersburg, 14 May 1896

Declaration between France and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 24 April (6 May) 1830

Declaration between Portugal and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 29 May (10 June) 1812

Declarations between Russia and Sweden-Norway, signed at St. Petersburg, 15(27) February 1827

Declarations between France and Russia, signed at St. Petersburg, 31 October (12 November) 1824

Declarations between Russia and Wurtemberg, signed at St. Petersburg, 31 October (12 November) 1824

 

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A treaty in 1868 that rejected the use of certain projectile weapons in war, on the principle that the only legitimate object of war is to weaken an enemy's military ...

Subjects: Warfare and Defence.


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