Overview

summary trial


'summary trial' can also refer to...

summary trial

summary trial

summary trial

summary trial

summary trial

Discussion summary: Trials methodology

Summary of Ceftaroline Fosamil Clinical Trial Studies and Clinical Safety

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Trial by magistrates without a jury. All summary offences are tried in this way, as well as some offences triable either way. The main procedural principles followed in trial on indictment also apply to summary trial, but there are some differences of which the most important are as follows. (1) The accused does not usually have to be present at the hearing. (2) Objections cannot usually be made either to information laid before the magistrates or to a summons or warrant served on the defendant on the grounds of “defects of substance or form” (unless they are fundamental defects). (3) In the case of summary offences, the accused may send in a written plea of guilty, together with a statement of mitigation, and the case may then be tried without the prosecution or defence appearing.

Subjects: Law.


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