Overview

surface scatter


More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Archaeology

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

[MC]

In America, a surface scatter is a site that has geological or geographical context but no archaeological associations. This includes material incorporated in secondary contexts such as river gravels or colluvium. In Britain, surface scatters are spreads of humanly worked material, often struck flint, which is taken to represent one of two things: (1) material brought into the topsoil by cultivation and derived from disturbed archaeological features of some kind (e.g. pits, ditches); (2) material remains of activities which only have a topsoil dimension in the sense that the material was originally dropped or placed or abandoned on the ground surface and over the course of time it has become incorporated into the topsoil where it has remained ever since. See also flint scatter.

(1) material brought into the topsoil by cultivation and derived from disturbed archaeological features of some kind (e.g. pits, ditches); (2) material remains of activities which only have a topsoil dimension in the sense that the material was originally dropped or placed or abandoned on the ground surface and over the course of time it has become incorporated into the topsoil where it has remained ever since.

Subjects: Archaeology.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.