Overview

Taking of Life


'Taking of Life' can also refer to...

Taking of Life

Taking Care of Later Life: A Matter of Justice?

Empathic Concern and Perspective Taking: Linear and Quadratic Effects of Age Across the Adult Life Span

Risk-Taking Differences Across the Adult Life Span: A Question of Age and Domain

Taking Stock of Health-Related Quality-of-Life Measurement in Oncology Practice in the United States

Examining Rowe and Kahn’s Concept of Successful Aging: Importance of Taking a Life Course Perspective

Health-Related Quality-of-Life Measurement in Randomized Clinical Trials in Breast Cancer—Taking Stock

Taking sustainable cities seriously: economic development, the environment, and quality of life in American cities
 Kent E. Portney, The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2003

‘You are taking who?! to a national conference on social policy?’: A place for youth in the social policy life of their communities

Taking the Hard Road. Life Course in French and German Workers' Autobiographies in the Era of Industrialization

Taking MTX for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: children's ratings and impact on health-related quality of life

Taking the Hard Road: Life Course in French and German Workers' Autobiographies in the Era of Industrialization. By Mary Jo Maynes (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995. xii plus 263pp. $39.95/hardcover $16.95/paperback)

Mary Jo Maynes. Taking the Hard Road: Life Course in French and German Workers' Autobiographies in the Era of Industrialization. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. 1995. Pp. xii, 263. Cloth $39.95, paper $16.95

323 By the King. A Proclamation for the securing of the Peace and safety of His Majesty's Subjects, against Outrages and disorders by any that were Souldiers of His Majesty's Armie lately disbanded, or others taking upon them to be such, or living idlely, or out of any good course of life. [Whitehall 22 October 1641]

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Literature

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

Is by far the most important crime committed in crime and mystery fiction, not only because of its sheer numerical predominance, but also because of its importance in initiating and ...

Subjects: Literature.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.