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tap water


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'tap water' can also refer to...

tap water

tap water

tap water

tap water

tap water

Cryptosporidium in Tap Water Comparison of Predicted Risks with Observed Levels of Disease

Hospital Tap Water as a Source of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Infection

Saliva promotes survival and even proliferation of Candida species in tap water

Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Deaths Associated With Sinus Irrigation Using Contaminated Tap Water

Turning Off the Tap: Urban Water Service Delivery and the Social Construction of Global Administrative Law

Exposure to arsenic in tap water and gestational diabetes: a French semi-ecological study Cécile Marie

The First Association of a Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Death With Culturable Naegleria fowleri in Tap Water From a US Treated Public Drinking Water System

An innovative system based on water-water heat pump with radiant panels and a ventilation energy recovery system for residential air-conditioning and tap water production

Measurement of Fuel Oxygenates in Tap Water Using Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography—Mass Spectrometry

Comparative Study of Sample Preparation Techniques Coupled to GC for the Analysis of Halogenated Acetic Acids (HAAs) Acids in Tap Water

Measurement of Trihalomethanes and Methyl Tertiary-Butyl Ether in Tap Water Using Solid-Phase Microextraction GC-MS

Self-Reported Diarrhea in a Control Group: A Strong Association with Reporting of Low-Pressure Events in Tap Water

131I DOSE ESTIMATION FROM INTAKE OF TAP WATER IN THE EARLY PHASE AFTER FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT

 

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Quick Reference

The water that emerges from taps in homes, public buildings, etc., and standpipes in low-income countries, where a single standpipe may service many families. Tap water usually comes from a reservoir. It may or may not have been partly purified by filtration and disinfected by chlorination, but it may still contain toxic or other chemicals and some pathogens, e.g., Giardia, cryptosporidium, and sometimes more dangerous pathogens such as Salmonella typhi. When there is doubt, water should be further tested and treated by boiling before it is used for drinking, cleaning vegetables, or cooking.

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology.


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