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Vajjī


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(Pāli; Skt., Vṛji).

In the time of the Buddha.one of the sixteen early Indian states (mahājanapada). The chief inhabitants of Vajjī were the Licchavi andVidehā clans with their capitals at Vaiśālī andMithilā.respectively. The Buddha was a frequent visitor to Vajjī and the inhabitants are described as a happy and prosperous people with a republican political structure supported by seven practices that the Buddha approved of, namely: (1) they held frequent public meetings; (2) they met together to take collective decisions and acted in concord; (3) they respected their customs and traditions; (4) they respected and supported their elders; (5) they did not allow the abduction of womenfolk; (6) they respected their places of worship; (7) they supported and protected the saints (Arhats) among them. After the Buddha's death the fortunes of the state declined and it was conquered by Ajātaśatru. It was ten lax practices of a group of monks from Vajjī, known as the Vajjiputtaka (Skt., Vṛjiputraka), that led to the convening of the Council of Vaiśālī some 100 years after the Buddha's death.

(1) they held frequent public meetings; (2) they met together to take collective decisions and acted in concord; (3) they respected their customs and traditions; (4) they respected and supported their elders; (5) they did not allow the abduction of womenfolk; (6) they respected their places of worship; (7) they supported and protected the saints (Arhats) among them. After the Buddha's death the fortunes of the state declined and it was conquered by Ajātaśatru.

Subjects: Buddhism.


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