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ventilation


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n.1. the passage of air into and out of the respiratory tract. The air that reaches only as far as the conducting airways cannot take part in gas exchange and is known as dead space ventilation – this may be reduced by performing a tracheostomy. In the air sacs of the lungs (alveoli) gas exchange is most efficient when matched by adequate blood flow (perfusion). Ventilation/perfusion imbalance (ventilation of underperfused alveoli or perfusion of underventilated alveoli) is an important cause of anoxia and cyanosis. 2. the use of a ventilator to maintain or support the breathing movements of patients. Invasive ventilation involves the insertion of an endotracheal tube (see intubation), through which air is blown into the lungs; patients need to be paralysed and anaesthetized. This need can be eliminated by using techniques of noninvasive ventilation.

1. the passage of air into and out of the respiratory tract. The air that reaches only as far as the conducting airways cannot take part in gas exchange and is known as dead space ventilation – this may be reduced by performing a tracheostomy. In the air sacs of the lungs (alveoli) gas exchange is most efficient when matched by adequate blood flow (perfusion). Ventilation/perfusion imbalance (ventilation of underperfused alveoli or perfusion of underventilated alveoli) is an important cause of anoxia and cyanosis. 2. the use of a ventilator to maintain or support the breathing movements of patients. Invasive ventilation involves the insertion of an endotracheal tube (see intubation), through which air is blown into the lungs; patients need to be paralysed and anaesthetized. This need can be eliminated by using techniques of noninvasive ventilation.

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


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