Overview

vestibular schwannoma


'vestibular schwannoma' can also refer to...

vestibular schwannoma

vestibular schwannoma

Vestibular Schwannomas and Menigiomas

Descriptive epidemiology of vestibular schwannomas1

Tumor pseudoprogression following radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma

Bilateral vestibular schwannomas: the challenge of neurofibromatosis type 2

Diseases of the temporal bone and schwannoma of the vestibular nerve

Sociodemographic factors and vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

Extracellular vesicles derived from human vestibular schwannomas associated with poor hearing damage cochlear cells

P13.17STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY WITH GAMMA KNIFE FOR NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2-ASSOCIATED VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMAS

MS-25GAMMA KNIFE RADIOSURGERY FOR VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA: ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY AND OUTCOMES

Bevacizumab induces regression of vestibular schwannomas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2†

ErbB/HER receptor activation and preclinical efficacy of lapatinib in vestibular schwannoma†

Therapeutic profile of single-fraction radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma: unrelated malignancy predicts tumor control

Relationships between imaging characteristics and hearing levels in patients with vestibular schwannomas treated by stereotactic radiosurgery

Radiographic regression of vestibular schwannomas induced by bevacizumab treatment: sustain under continuous drug application and rebound after drug discontinuation

Bevacizumab in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) related vestibular schwannomas: a nationally coordinated approach to delivery and prospective evaluation

Components of the eIF4F complex are potential therapeutic targets for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and vestibular schwannomas

P13.26LINEAR ACCELERATOR RADIOSURGERY FOR THE TREATMENT OF NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE 2 RELATED VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMAS

 

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Quick Reference

A slow-growing benign tumour arising on one of the vestibular nerves. It is also known as an acoustic neuroma, but this is a misnomer as the tumour arises from Schwann cells rather than nerve cells and on a vestibular nerve rather than the cochlear (acoustic) nerve. Symptoms include hearing loss, tinnitus, and imbalance and there is an increased prevalence of the tumour in patients who have neurofibromatosis type II. Diagnosis is by MRI scan and treatment is not always required. In those cases where treatment is necessary, this may be by surgery, radiotherapy, or gamma knife.

Subjects: Medicine and Health.


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