Raoul Walsh


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(1887–1980). Film director. Known for his rugged he-man touch in many male action pictures, he also directed a dozen movie musicals in the 1940s and 1950s. Walsh was born in New York City but ran away from home as a boy and had adventures at sea and in cattle ranches out west. He turned to acting in 1910 and worked for D. W. Griffith, first as an actor (he played John Wilkes Booth in the 1915 classic The Birth of a Nation) and then as an assistant director, before becoming a prolific director in his own right who helmed over 100 films. He is most known for outdoor adventures such as The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and blistering melodramas such as The Roaring Twenties (1939), yet he also helmed a number of sensitive dramas and stylish musicals, such as Going Hollywood (1933), Every Night at Eight (1935), Artists and Models (1937), St. Louis Blues (1939), The Man I Love (1946), and A Private Affair (1959). Autobiography: Each Man in His Time (1974).

From The Oxford Companion to the American Musical in Oxford Reference.

Subjects: Music Theatre.

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