Overview

white-collar worker


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'white-collar worker' can also refer to...

white-collar worker

White-collar worker

white-collar worker

white-collar worker

White-collar Workers

white-collar worker

white-collar worker

Bullying in Turkish white-collar workers

Normal Cholesterol Measurements in White Collar Workers Still at Cardiovascular Risk?

Changing White‐collar Workplaces and Female Temporary Workers in Japan

Working Girls: White-Collar Workers and Prostitutes in Late Weimar Fiction

Services Offshoring and the Relative Demand for White-collar Workers in German Manufacturing

Effort-Reward Imbalance at Work and the Prevalence of Unsuccessfully Treated Hypertension Among White-Collar Workers

Job strain and neck–shoulder symptoms: a prevalence study of women and men white-collar workers

The Idea of the Middle Class: White-Collar Workers and Peruvian Society, 1900–1950. By D. S. Parker (University Park, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998. xii plus 266pp. $49.50/cloth $19.95/paperback)

For All White-Collar Workers: The Possibilities of Radicalism in New York City's Department Store Unions, 1934–1953. By Daniel J. Opler. (Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2007. x, 270 pp. $49.95, ISBN 978-0-8142-1063-5.)

D. S. Parker. The Idea of the Middle Class: White-Collar Workers and Peruvian Society, 1900–1950. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. 1998. Pp. xii, 266. Cloth $49.50, paper $19.95

Daniel J. Opler. For All White-Collar Workers: The Possibilities of Radicalism in New York City's Department Store Unions, 1934–1953. Columbus: Ohio State University Press. 2007. Pp. ix, 270. $49.95, CD $9.95.

 

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Is a worker who traditionally wears a collar and tie to work and is engaged in non-manual work as a clerk, sales assistant, technician, manager, or professional. By tradition, white-collar workers were relatively privileged (see status divide), were paid a salary, rather than an hourly or weekly wage, and received an occupational pension and other fringe benefits. In many countries, they have their own trade unions, known as white-collar unions. Today, in post-industrial economies, like Britain or the USA, the majority of employees are engaged in white-collar work.

Subjects: Human Resource Management.


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