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Winter War


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Red Army

Carl Gustav Emil Mannerheim, Baron von (1867—1951)

Joseph Stalin (1879—1953) Soviet statesman, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the USSR 1922–53

 

'Winter War' can also refer to...

Winter War

Winter War

Winter war

Winter War (30 Nov. 1939–12 Mar. 1940)

Jay Winter and Antoine Prost. René Cassin and Human Rights: From the Great War to the Universal Declaration.

Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History. By Jay Winter (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. x plus 310pp.)

Review: The Winter King: Frederick V of the Palatinate and the Coming of the Thirty Years War

Shadows of War: A Social History of Silence in the Twentieth Century, ed. Efrat Ben-Ze’ev, Ruth Ginio and Jay Winter

Jay Winter. Remembering War: The Great War and Historical Memory in the Twentieth Century. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press. 2006. Pp. viii, 329. $35.00

The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century. Episode 1: “Explosion,” 2: “Stalemate,” 3: “Total War,” 4: “Slaughter,” 5: “Mutiny,” 6: “Collapse,” 7: “Hatred and Hunger,” 8: “War without End.” Produced by Blaine Baggett, Carl Byker, David Mrazek, Lyn Goldfarb, and Jay Winter, for KCET, Los Angeles/BBC, London, in association with the Imperial War Museum; directed by Carl Byker, Lyn Goldfarb, Margaret Koval; written by Jay Winter and Blaine Baggett with Carl Byker, Lyn Goldfarb, and Joseph Angier; chief historian, Jay Winter. 1996; color and black & white; 8 hours. Distributor: PBS Home Video

Capital Cities at War: Paris, London, Berlin 1914–1919. By Jay Winter and Jean-Louis Robert (New York: Cambridge, 1997. xvii plus 622pp. $90.00)

The Valley Forge Winter: Civilians and Soldiers in War. By Wayne Bodle. (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002. xiv, 335 pp. $35.00, isbn 0-271-02230-2.)

Jay Winter. Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History. (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare number 1.) New York: Cambridge University Press. 1995. Pp. x, 310. $29.95

Juha Mälkki. Herrat, jätkät ja sotataito: Kansalaissotilas-ja ammattisotilasarmeijan rakentuminen 1920-ja 1930-luvulla “talvisodan ihmeeksi” [Gentlemen, Lads and the Art of War: The Construction of Citizen Soldier and Professional Soldier Armies into “the Miracle of the Winter War” during the 1920s and 1930s]. (Bibliotheca Historica, number 117.) Helsinki: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura. 2008. Pp. 364. €29.00

Jay Winter and Antoine Prost. The Great War in History: Debates and Controversies, 1914 to the Present. (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare.) English edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. 2005. Pp. viii, 250. Cloth $70.00, paper $28.99

Jay Winter, Jean-Louis Robert, editors. Capital Cities at War: Paris, London, Berlin 1914–1919, Volume 2, A Cultural History. (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare, number 25.) New York: Cambridge University Press. 2007. Pp. xiii, 545. $110.00

John Horne, editor. State, Society and Mobilization in Europe during the First World War. (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare, number 3.) New York: Cambridge University Press. 1997. Pp. xv, 292. $59.95 and Jay Winter and Jean-Louis Robert. Capital Cities at War: Paris, London, Berlin, 1914–1919. (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare, number 2.) New York: Cambridge University Press. 1997. Pp. xvii, 622. $90.00

 

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(30 Nov. 1939–12 Mar. 1940)

Following the Finnish government's refusal to grant Soviet demands for naval bases and a frontier revision, the Red Army attacked on three fronts. Led by General Mannerheim, the Finns' superior skill in manœuvring on frozen lakes, across the Gulf of Finland, and in the forests, on skis, kept the Soviet forces at bay. After fifteen weeks of fierce fighting, however, Soviet troops breached the defensive Mannerheim Line. On 12 March 1940 Finland was forced to accept peace on Stalin's terms, ceding its eastern territories and the port of Viipuri (Vyborg), altogether 10 per cent of its territory.

Subjects: Contemporary History (Post 1945).


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