Overview

work ethic


'work ethic' can also refer to...

work ethic

work ethic

work ethic

work ethic

work ethic

Too Much Work Ethic One Reason Poverty Rates Stopped Falling in the 70s, and the Stories That Were Told about It

Protestant work ethic

Protestant work ethic

Protestant work ethic

Review: Heart‐Work: George Herbert and the Protestant Ethic

Moving Capital, Moving Workers, and the Mountain Work Ethic

The Ethic of Care: Recapturing Social Work's First Voice

“Sweat or Die”: The Hedonization of the Work Ethic in the 1920s

Review: More Than Chains and Toil: A Christian Work Ethic of Enslaved Women

The Leisure Ethic: Work and Play in American Literature, 1840–1940. By William A. Gleason (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999. xviii plus 446pp. $60.00)

Visualizing Labor in American Sculpture: Monuments, Manliness, and the Work Ethic, 1880–1935. By Melissa Dabakis. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999. xvi, 296 pp. $80.00, ISBN 0-521-46147-2.)

The Leisure Ethic: Work and Play in American Literature, 1840–1940. By William A. Gleason. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999. xx, 446 pp. Cloth, $60.00, ISBN 0-8047-3399-6. Paper, $19.95, ISBN 0-8047-3434-8.)

Sharon Beder. Selling the Work Ethic: From Puritan Pulpit to Corporate PR. London: Zed Books, 2001. viii + 292 pp. ISBN 1‐85649‐884‐0, $65.95 (cloth); 1‐85649‐885‐9, $25.00 (paper)

Melissa Dabakis. Visualizing Labor in American Sculpture: Monuments, Manliness, and the Work Ethic, 1880–1935. (Cambridge Studies in American Visual Culture.) New York: Cambridge University Press. 1999. Pp. xvi, 296. $80.00

 

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Sports and Exercise Medicine
  • Sociology

GO

Show Summary Details

Quick Reference

The idea of productive labour, or work, being valued in and for itself by those who do it, encouraging them to invest greater effort than could be achieved by social pressures, incentive payments, or other devices developed by employers to extract maximum output from their workforces. The concept is a unique product of Western European culture; other cultures rely on different social, religious, and political ideologies to encourage productive labour and the fulfilment of social obligations. The idea was derived originally from the protestant ethic, which presents work as a religious and moral obligation, and is now widely used as a simplified popular version of that concept, especially in the context of explanations for low or high productivity and economic growth. The relevant American and British research in sociology, psychology, economics, and political science is reviewed systematically in Michael Rose, Re-working the Work Ethic (1985). See also achievement motivation; entrepreneur; task-orientation versus time-orientation distinction; work, subjective experience of.

Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine — Sociology.


Reference entries

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.