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Social architecture


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'Social architecture' can also refer to...

Social architecture

Social architecture

An Architecture of Social Being

Betjeman, John (1906 - 1984), poet, architectural, social historian

The Social Architecture of French Cinema: 1929–1939

Monumental Architecture and Social Complexity in the Intermediate Area

The Social Architecture of French Cinema, 1929–1939

Continuities and Change in the Design of Canada's Social Architecture

Jewish Sanctuary in the Atlantic World: A Social and Architectural History

Nest architecture, colony productivity, and duration of immature stages in a social wasp, Mischocyttarus consimilis

Social dance in the 1668 Feste de Versailles: architecture and performance context

Women and the Making of the Modern House: A Social and Architectural History

Architecture, Volumetrics, and Social Stratification at Motul de San José during the Late and Terminal Classic

Redbrick: A Social and Architectural History of Britain’s Civic Universities, by William Whyte

William Whyte. Redbrick: A Social and Architectural History of Britain’s Civic Universities.

Sharman Kadish, The Synagogues of Britain and Ireland: An Architectural and Social History. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. xiv + 398 pp.; 248 ills.

Buildings for Bluestockings: The Architecture and Social History of Women's Colleges in Late Victorian England Margaret Birney Vickery

Social Movement Organizations and Changing State Architectures: Comparing Women’s Movement Organizing in Flanders and Scotland

The British Market Hall: A Social and Architectural History. By James Schmiechen and Kenneth Carls (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1999. Xii plus 312 pp. $50)

 

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Quick Reference

1 Architecture intended for use by the mass of people as social beings as a reaction against architecture concerned with form and style supposedly for the dominant members of society.

2 Schools and other buildings erected after the 1939–45 war in England incorporating scientific method, prefabrication, and industrialized building as part of the Modern Movement.

C. R. Hatch (1984);Saint (1987);R. Sommer (1983)

Subjects: Architecture.


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