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aggression


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N.

(in international law) According to the General Assembly Resolution (3314) on the Definition of Aggression 1975, the use of armed force by one state against the sovereignty, territorial integrity, or political independence of another state or in any way inconsistent with the Charter of the United Nations. The Resolution lists examples of aggression, which include the following:(1) invasion, attack, military occupation, or annexation of the territory of any state by the armed forces of another state;(2) bombardment or the use of any weapons by a state against another state's territory;(3) armed blockade by a state of another state's ports or coasts;(4) the use of a state's armed forces in another state in breach of the terms of the agreement on which they were allowed into that state;(5) allowing one's territory to be placed at the disposal of another state, to be used by that state for committing an act of aggression against a third state;(6) sending armed bands or guerrillas to carry out armed raids on another state that are grave enough to amount to any of the above acts.The first use of armed force by a state in contravention of the UN Charter is prima facie evidence of aggression, although the final decision in such cases is left to the Security Council, who may also classify other acts as aggression. The Resolution declares that no consideration whatsoever can justify aggression, that territory cannot be acquired by acts of aggression, and that wars of aggression constitute a crime against international peace. See also humanitarian intervention; Martens clause; occupation; offences against international law and order; use of force; war; war crimes.

(1) invasion, attack, military occupation, or annexation of the territory of any state by the armed forces of another state;

(2) bombardment or the use of any weapons by a state against another state's territory;

(3) armed blockade by a state of another state's ports or coasts;

(4) the use of a state's armed forces in another state in breach of the terms of the agreement on which they were allowed into that state;

(5) allowing one's territory to be placed at the disposal of another state, to be used by that state for committing an act of aggression against a third state;

(6) sending armed bands or guerrillas to carry out armed raids on another state that are grave enough to amount to any of the above acts.

Subjects: Law.


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