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crossing the line


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crossing the line

crossing the Line

Crossing the Line

Crossing the Line Women's Interracial Activism in South Carolina during and after World War II

Crossing The Line

crossing the line

crossing the line

Crossing the Line: Republikflucht between Defection and Migration

Crossing the Cosmological Constant Line on the Warped DGP Brane

Professional Boundaries: Crossing a Line or Entering the Shadows?

Crossing the Line: Nonviolent Resisters Speak Out for Peace. By Rosalie Riegle.

Crossing the Color Line: A Brief Historical Survey of Race Relations in American Evangelical Christianity

Crossing the Line: Women's Interracial Activism in South Carolina during and after World War II

Everyday Ethics in Dementia Day Care: Narratives of Crossing the Line1

Crossing the Color Line in Little Rock: The Eisenhower Administration and the Dilemma of Race for U.S. Foreign Policy

Daniel T. Rogers, Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age; Robert C. Lieberman, Shifting the Color Line: Race and the American Welfare State

Cherisse Jones-Branch. Crossing the Line: Women's Interracial Activism in South Carolina during and after World War II.

Crossing Over the Line: Legislating Morality and the Mann Act. By David J. Langum (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1994. xxi plus 311pp. $24.95)

David J. Langum. Crossing Over the Line: Legislating Morality and the Mann Act. (The Chicago Series in Sexuality, History, and Society.) Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 1994. Pp. xii, 311. $24.95

 

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In film and video editing, a convention that a shot of a subject from one side should not be followed immediately by a shot of the same subject from the opposite side (a 180-degree shift). The traditional argument has been that most viewers would find this disorientating since it produces a mirroring effect that could threaten narrative comprehension. For instance, filming a moving vehicle in this way might be misread as an abrupt reversal of its direction of travel or even as a head-on crash with itself. However, there are many examples of celebrated film-makers who do break this rule and, arguably, modern audiences have grown more tolerant of such transgressions because of their knowledge of film editing practices. See also 180-degree rule.

http://www.mediacollege.com/video/editing/transition/reverse-cut.html Crossing the line

Subjects: Media Studies.


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