Article

Introduction

Roger S. Gottlieb

in The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Ecology

Published in print November 2006 | ISBN: 9780195178722
Published online September 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195178722.003.0001

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Religion and Theology

Introduction

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In the last two decades, the connections between religion and ecology have been manifest by explosive growth in theological writings, scholarship, institutional commitment, and public action. Theologians from every religious tradition—along with dozens of non-denominational spiritual writers—have confronted religions' attitudes toward nature and complicity in the environmental crisis. This confrontation has given rise to vital new theologies based in the recovery of marginalized elements of tradition, profound criticisms of the past, and new visions of God, the sacred, the earth, and human beings. Religious morality has expanded to include our relations to other species and ecosystems, and religious practice has come to include rituals to help us express our grief and remorse and also to celebrate what is left. Further, dialogues on how traditional religions viewed nature and how these views should be reinterpreted or altered in light of the environmental crisis now join criticisms of economics, technology, energy policies, science, transportation, agriculture, taxation, and education.

Keywords: God; religion; ecology; science; nature; environmental crisis; sacred; human beings; religious morality

Article.  8628 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Religious Studies ; Religion and Science

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