Article

Science and Scientific Inquiry in Aristotle: A Platonic Provenance

Robert Bolton

in The Oxford Handbook of Aristotle

Published in print August 2012 | ISBN: 9780195187489
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195187489.013.0003

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Philosophy

 Science and Scientific Inquiry in Aristotle: A Platonic Provenance

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Philosophy
  • Classical Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Science

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Aristotle's word for science is epistêmê, which has at least a dual use in the Greek of his day and is standardly used, in one way, as a count noun, to mean “a science.” Thus, in this usage, one can say that geometry, or phusikê (natural science), or metaphysics is (an) epistêmê, a science. Here the term epistêmê designates a special sort of systematic body of truth or fact that may or may not have yet been discovered, or fully discovered. In Plato's Protagoras (352cff.), Socrates uses the term epistêmê for knowledge of the particular right moral action to perform on some specific occasion and he is followed in this use of the term by Aristotle in Nicomachean Ethics VII.2 (1145b21ff.). Aristotle claims that scientific principles are reached by induction (epagogê).

Keywords: Aristotle; Plato; science; epistêmê; knowledge; induction; Socrates; Protagoras; Nicomachean Ethics

Article.  8003 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; Classical Philosophy ; Philosophy of Science

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.