Article

Millennial Visions and Conflict with Society

David G. Bromley and Catherine Wessinger

in The Oxford Handbook of Millennialism

Published in print October 2011 | ISBN: 9780195301052
Published online January 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195301052.003.0010

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 Millennial Visions and Conflict with Society

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This article deals with issue of conflicts emanating from socially incompatible millennialist values. Millennialist strains across the spectrum assume two common factors—the end of the world as it is hitherto and the ushering of a transformed order and group mobilization in anticipation or in furtherance of anticipated events. Social mobilization generates a two-fold responsibility for the millennialists—first, they should deliver on promises and second, the objective ways and the grounds for recruitment must be socially compatible. The latter reflects a paradox, as social incompatibility within the millennialist school is deliberate and essential. Quite aware of the possibilities, many groups term various state institutions as “agents of Babylon”, so as to justify any extremity on their own part. The millennial three-pronged crisis strategy of exodus, compromise, and confrontation actually suggests informed deliberation. Prominent issues such as gun hoarding and engaging adolescents sexually, have been some of the grave charges leveled against millennial groups.

Keywords: social mobilization; millennialist values; gun hoarding; exodus; Babylon

Article.  10608 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Religious Studies ; Alternative Belief Systems

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