Article

Chinese Millennial Movements

Scott Lowe

in The Oxford Handbook of Millennialism

Published in print October 2011 | ISBN: 9780195301052
Published online January 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195301052.003.0016

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 Chinese Millennial Movements

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Class apathy and a selective process of record keeping created fertile grounds for uprise in China. This article throws light on two of the earliest millennialist movements in China, namely, the Taiping Dao and the Wudoumi Dao movements that emerged from havoc, intending to create millennial commonwealth and practiced healing through confession. The Chinese Buddhist millennialism synthesized a modified version of the Indian concept of “kalpa” and the Buddhist teaching of the three ages where each age ends with the demise of a “Bodhisattva” and marks a decline based on the degeneration of Buddha's teachings. It states that the dark age graced by superhuman saviors shall witness the arrival of the Maitreya, the next Buddha incarnate. The Chinese Communist Party's (CCP) rhetoric about “a thousand years of prosperity” is also considered reflective of millennial views.

Keywords: Chinese Buddhist millennialism; Taiping Dao; Wudoumi Dao movements; kalpa; Bodhisattva; Chinese Communist Party

Article.  9142 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Religious Studies ; East Asian Religions ; Philosophy of Religion ; Christianity ; Buddhism

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