Article

Literacy Development in Childhood, Adolescence, and Young Adulthood in Persons with Down Syndrome

Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird and Robin S. Chapman

in The Oxford Handbook of Intellectual Disability and Development

Published in print August 2011 | ISBN: 9780195305012
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195305012.013.0013

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 Literacy Development in Childhood, Adolescence, and Young Adulthood in Persons with Down Syndrome

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Literacy enriches and expands opportunities for participation in activities in the home, school, work and community. There are many economic, social, and cultural benefits to being literate (Robinson-Pant, 2005). For example, individuals with more advanced literacy skills are more frequently employed, earn higher wages, and are more likely to be promoted (Johnson, 2000). Furthermore, they tend to have increased self-esteem, greater empowerment, and expanded recreational opportunities. Becoming literate presumably has the same advantages for individuals with Down syndrome (DS) as it would for any other person in a literate society. With changing policies and demographics, the literacy potential of individuals with DS is only now becoming understood and may well be underestimated in the early literature in this area. In this chapter, we review the literature on the literacy abilities of individuals with DS and make recommendations for future research.

Keywords: Down syndrome; literacy; reading; writing; development

Article.  8954 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Developmental Psychology

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