Article

The Coinage of the Roman Provinces through Hadrian

Michel Amandry

in The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage

Published in print February 2012 | ISBN: 9780195305746
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195305746.013.0022

Series: Oxford Handbooks

The Coinage of the Roman Provinces through Hadrian

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Classical Studies
  • Greek and Roman Archaeology
  • Historical Archaeology

GO

Preview

This article explores imperial coinage and provincial coinage during Roman provinces. The latter was produced at different levels (and eventually even at Rome), but was on the whole intended to take over for the state regionally. Some coins actually did not carry the image of the emperor or a member of the imperial family. Coins without an imperial portrait were struck at Rome, and nobody ever imagined any sort of pseudo-autonomy for these strikings. From Augustus to Hadrian, other administrative changes took place, in Anatolia in particular, but had no impact on the production of provincial coins, which was not the same in the west and the east. It ceased rapidly in the west. Civic coinages were produced in Spain, Africa, and Sicily under Augustus, only to decline very quickly. In the east, however, local coinage endured until the time of Tacitus.

Keywords: Roman provinces; coins; imperial coinage; provincial coinage; Hadrian

Article.  5002 words. 

Subjects: Classical Studies ; Greek and Roman Archaeology ; Historical Archaeology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »