Article

Syria in the Roman Period, 64 BC–AD 260

Kevin Butcher

in The Oxford Handbook of Greek and Roman Coinage

Published in print February 2012 | ISBN: 9780195305746
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195305746.013.0026

Series: Oxford Handbooks

Syria in the Roman Period, 64 BC–AD 260

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The circulation and use of coins in Syria during the Roman period explains concepts of value and sovereignty, and sheds some light on the structure of provincial society, while the coins' iconography and inscriptions teach us about the symbols of identity deployed by the various cities that issued them. Most coinages of the second class were of bronze, but not all. Syrian coins, both silver and bronze, are not generally found outside the province, suggesting that both classes of coin were perceived of as “foreign” by outsiders. The mint of Rome was also sporadically involved with production of special provincial silver issues for Syria. Therefore, the products of the Roman mint, in the form of the standard precious metal coins of the empire, the silver denarius and gold aureus, were being hoarded in Syria in the second century AD, yet it is not entirely clear when they were introduced to the region.

Keywords: Syria; coins; Roman period; coinages; mint; denarius; aureus

Article.  7230 words. 

Subjects: Classical Studies ; Greek and Roman Archaeology ; Historical Archaeology

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