Article

The Limits of Language and the Notion of Analogy

Brian Davies

in The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas

Published in print January 2012 | ISBN: 9780195326093
Published online May 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195326093.013.0029

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 The Limits of Language and the Notion of Analogy

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Philosophy
  • History of Western Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Language

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Aquinas argued that God accounts for the existence (esse) of all substances for as long as they exist and God is nothing bodily nor is he something with attributes distinguishable from himself. He argued that God is identical with what can be truly affirmed of him and God is immutable and there is no distinction in God of essence (essentia) and existence (esse). Aquinas argued that people who say that God is good just do not mean that God is not bad. They mean that God is actually good in and of himself. The people who say that God is living are not just saying that God is not inanimate but they are telling what God really is. Aquinas argued that God may cause what is good, but, as Creator of the universe, as the cause of the esse of things, God also causes (makes to be) what is bodily. In Aquinas's view, God is good, and is whatever he is by nature, regardless of what he has brought about (created/caused to be). Aquinas argued that words applied to creatures cannot mean exactly the same when applied to God, since God is not something distinct from his nature. Aquinas also wanted to say that words applied to creatures cannot mean something entirely different when applied to God.

Keywords: essence; existence; ipsum esse existens; Summa theologiae

Article.  4150 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; History of Western Philosophy ; Philosophy of Language

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.