Article

Woman's Rights and Feminism

Phyllis Cole

in The Oxford Handbook of Transcendentalism

Published in print April 2010 | ISBN: 9780195331035
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195331035.013.0016

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 Woman's Rights and Feminism

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Literature
  • Literary Theory and Cultural Studies
  • Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers)

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This article outlines a tradition of women and their male supporters who addressed the status of women in a Transcendentalist vein. Transcendentalist women found influence in writers and therefore headed in that direction. Women had no Harvard regimen to boycott or nay pulpit or citizenship from which to stand aside as they were denied access to higher studies. They claimed the power of private thought and by so doing made a case for authority in church and republic. Margaret Fuller's career was one of the best examples of it and her contributions are projected throughout the article. Well-read women became writers, first in letters and diaries, but then by submitting their work to periodicals. Even book publication, though unconventional, was not barred by the formal gender prescriptions of church and state. The article states that private letters and journals were the sources that expressed the most unfiltered thoughts of Transcendentalist women.

Keywords: Feminism; Margaret Fuller; gender prescription; moral equality; New England

Article.  9320 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Theory and Cultural Studies ; Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.