Article

Concord

Ronald A. Bosco

in The Oxford Handbook of Transcendentalism

Published in print April 2010 | ISBN: 9780195331035
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195331035.013.0035

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 Concord

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Literature
  • Literary Studies (19th Century)
  • Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers)

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

While much of the exchange between the Transcendentalists occurred in Boston, without a doubt the heart of the movement was in the nearby small town of Conocrd. Concord was the birthplace for Henry David Thoreau and a long-time home for members of Ralph Waldo Emerson's extended family. Having spent boyhood summers in the town, Emerson settled there as an adult. The Hawthornes and Alcotts also lived in the small town for some years. By the 1850s, Concord had become a pilgrimage destination as people from all over the United States and the world came to pay homage to Emerson. This article is far less about how we approach, see, feel, and appropriate Concord today than about how Concord was approached, seen, felt, and appropriated by William Dean Howells and his contemporaries, who visited the town and took it into their respective consciousnesses from the middle of the nineteenth century into the early twentieth.

Keywords: Concord; contemporaries; William Dean Howells; self-discovery

Article.  8957 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (19th Century) ; Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.