Article

Logical Form

Paul Thom

in The Oxford Handbook of Medieval Philosophy

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780195379488
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195379488.013.0012

Series: Oxford Handbooks

Logical Form

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This article notes that some aspects of what constitutes good argumentation were seen as deriving from formal considerations. These aspects were treated by the medievals as falling under a concept of logical form, but there were at least two notions of logical form. In one sense, form is contrasted with matter in the context of Aristotelian hylomorphic theory. In another sense, form contrasts with matter, that which it is about (id de quo). In this second sense, the matter that is opposed to form is subject matter, or content. Both these notions of form can be traced back to Aristotle, the hylomorphic concept to his physical and metaphysical works, the notion of form as opposed to content to some of his logical works.

Keywords: argumentation; hylomorphic theory; Aristotle; metaphysics; logical form

Article.  8547 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; History of Western Philosophy ; Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic

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