Article

Monumental Landscape and Community in the Southern Lower Mississippi Valley During the Late Woodland and Mississippi Periods

Mark A. Rees

in The Oxford Handbook of North American Archaeology

Published in print February 2012 | ISBN: 9780195380118
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195380118.013.0040

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 Monumental Landscape and Community in the Southern Lower Mississippi Valley During the Late Woodland and Mississippi Periods

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Much of what is known today about ancient Native American cultures of the Lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) stems from studies of sites with earthen mounds, along with ceramic artifacts that have provided a major source of cultural-historical information. Phillips et al. described the LMV in their landmark survey as extending more than 900 kilometers (559 miles), from the Ohio River to the Gulf of Mexico. This includes the area north of the Arkansas River, subsequently referred to as the Central Mississippi Valley. Northern and southern segments of the LMV have long been distinguished largely on the basis of ceramics, separated around the Arkansas Lowland. This article focuses on Native American communities of the southern LMV during the centuries following the Middle Woodland or Marksville period (AD 1–400), although the northern LMV and earlier periods are mentioned in comparative context.

Keywords: Lower Mississippi Valley; Native American cultures; ceramic artifacts; Arkansas Lowland; Middle Woodland; cultural-historical information

Article.  4680 words. 

Subjects: Archaeology ; Archaeology of North America

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