Current and Future Technologies in the Education of Deaf Students

Michael S. Stinson

in The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education, Vol. 2

Published in print June 2010 | ISBN: 9780195390032
Published online September 2012 | | DOI:

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

Current and Future Technologies in the Education of Deaf Students

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Psychology
  • Educational Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology



This chapter considers six key educational technologies that are used with deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) students: (1) television and in-class captioning, (2) interactive whiteboards, (3) tablet PCs, (4) World Wide Web, (5) sign language and bilingual media, and (6) handheld technologies. In regard to television captioning, neither a slower rate of displaying captions nor less linguistic complexity consistently enhances performance. In addition, classroom-captioning services appear to produce either equal or increased student performance compared to interpreting services. Although interactive whiteboards appear to have considerable education potential, reports of the use of these whiteboards with DHH students have been descriptions of experiences instead of empirical research. Tablet PCs appear to have potential in educating DHH students, however, studies that include more than a few students and thorough objective measurement are needed to provide reliable findings. Web-based instruction can promote the learning of content by DHH students when the material engages them, and web-based instruction through online learning provides a means for direct, asynchronous, text-based communication between DHH and hearing students. Many, if not most, DHH people usually carry with them a handheld technology, primarily for communication purposes.

Keywords: Captioning; interactive whiteboard; tablet PC; World Wide Web; sign language and bilingual media; handheld technologies

Article.  10941 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Educational Psychology ; Developmental Psychology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »