Learning Life Skills of Emotional and Social Intelligence Competencies

Richard E. Boyatzis

in The Oxford Handbook of Lifelong Learning

Published in print March 2011 | ISBN: 9780195390483
Published online November 2012 | | DOI:

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

Learning Life Skills of Emotional and Social Intelligence Competencies

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  • Psychology
  • Organizational Psychology
  • Educational Psychology



Emotional and social intelligence competencies distinguish effective performance among managers, leaders, and professionals. People in power (i.e., leading and helping) roles infect others with their emotional state through the contagion of emotion. The consequences of using emotional and social intelligence competencies are amplified in work and social settings. Although most attempts to develop these competencies at work and in graduate education fail, there is longitudinal evidence that they can be sustainably developed. Intentional Change Theory explains the physiological and psychological processes that result in significant improvement in these competencies. The three most distinctive aspects of this model, in contrast to typical approaches, include: (1) fostering the person’s ideal self, their personal vision, and their dream before exposing them to any data feedback; (2) using coaches to create relationships that help someone through the process; and (3) developing social identity groups that create peer coaching relationships and sustain the developments.

Keywords: competency development; complexity; intentional change; emotional intelligence; social intelligence; leadership; power

Article.  7076 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Organizational Psychology ; Educational Psychology

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