Article

Grouping and Segmentation in Human and Nonhuman Primates

Joël Fagot, Isabelle Barbet and Carole Parron

in The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Cognition

Second edition

Published in print March 2012 | ISBN: 9780195392661
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195392661.013.0002

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

Grouping and Segmentation in Human and Nonhuman Primates

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

GO

Preview

This chapter focuses on the processing of visual information by nonhuman primates. It presents two main lines of research to illustrate similarities and differences in the processing of visual information by baboons and humans. The first line of research concerns perceptual grouping, a highly adaptive process by which parts of objects are put together into a whole. It demonstrates that baboons are not as quick as humans to group spatially separated elements into a single percept, and reports convergent findings from other species supporting that conclusion. The second line of research concerns the perception of depth cues. It shows that baboons can perceive depth from pictorial depth cues, as humans do, but it also highlights subtle human–baboon differences in their processing of occlusion cues as an indicator of depth, probably as a consequence of species variations in grouping mechanism. The chapter emphasizes the potential heuristic significance of these findings for accounting for species differences in higher cognitive functions.

Keywords: visual information processing; nonhuman primates; perceptual grouping; baboons; depth cues

Article.  9253 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Cognitive Neuroscience

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »