Article

Establishing Frames of Reference for Finding Hidden GoalsThe Use of Multiple Spatial Cues by Nonhuman Animals and People

Brett Gibson

in The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Cognition

Second edition

Published in print March 2012 | ISBN: 9780195392661
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195392661.013.0008

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 Establishing Frames of Reference for Finding Hidden GoalsThe Use of Multiple Spatial Cues by Nonhuman Animals and People

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This chapter presents work that explores how different types of spatial information may interact for control of spatial behavior in both nonhuman animals and people. It focuses on how cues from different frames of reference (egocentric vs. geocentric) may interact, as well as how cues from the same type of frame (geometry cues vs. feature cues within a geocentric frame) may be used to direct search for a hidden goal. Although several studies suggest that mammals and insects are capable of using egocentric cues to establish a frame of reference, the research with nutcrackers has suggested that this food-storing bird is also able to use self-motion cues to accurately locate hidden food.

Keywords: spatial information; spatial behavior; frames of reference; self-motion cues; nutcrackers

Article.  13939 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Cognitive Neuroscience

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