Article

<b>Sensitivity to TimeImplications for the Representation of Time</b>

Jonathon D. Crystal

in The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Cognition

Second edition

Published in print March 2012 | ISBN: 9780195392661
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195392661.013.0023

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 Sensitivity to TimeImplications for the Representation of Time

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter reviews studies on the psychophysical function for time. It provides evidence that time perception across many ranges is nonlinear, which may provide a basis for the development of a unified theory of timing that encompasses the discrimination of temporal intervals across several orders of magnitude—from milliseconds to days. The integration of concepts and methodologies from short-interval and circadian research may facilitate the development of such a unified theory. The proposed system is capable of representing when specific events occurred in time, just as people describe when events took place using a calendar–date–time system. This type of timing system retains the time of occurrence of earlier events. Moreover, time of occurrence may be encoded not only with respect to a circadian oscillator, but also with respect to other oscillators. Other oscillators may exist in the long-interval range (e.g., 20 hours), in the short-interval range (e.g., 1 to 3 minutes), and perhaps above 24 hours.

Keywords: timing; time sensitivity; linear timing hypothesis; time perception

Article.  9399 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Cognitive Neuroscience

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.