Article

One Nation, Many Voices: The Muslim Press in the United States

Faiza Hirji

in The Oxford Handbook of Religion and the American News Media

Published in print August 2012 | ISBN: 9780195395068
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195395068.013.0038

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 One Nation, Many Voices: The Muslim Press in the United States

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The story of the Muslim press in the United States is a story of struggle: the struggle for justice, identity, and the ability to be heard. It is also a story of the evolution of the extraordinarily diverse Muslim population in the United States and American Muslims' desire to forge identities that balance the various influences in their lives. Islam has its very origins in reading: on the night that Muhammad became a prophet, he received his first revelations in written form. Though illiterate, Muhammad was visited by the angel Gabriel and ordered to read. Perplexed, Muhammad discovered in response to the angel's insistent command that he had miraculously been granted this ability. The passages that he read on that night, which Muslims commemorate every year as a sacred occasion, are the first ones revealed from the Quran. For that reason, the idea of books, of print, and of knowledge remains sacred within Islam. This article explores the development of the Muslim press and the challenges it faces as American Muslims enter a new era.

Keywords: Muslim press; Islam; United States; American Muslims; Muhammad

Article.  6162 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Religious Studies ; Islam ; Interfaith Relations

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