Article

The Online World, the Internet, Social Class, and Counseling

Belle Liang, Nicole Duffy and Meghan Commins

in The Oxford Handbook of Social Class in Counseling

Published in print March 2013 | ISBN: 9780195398250
Published online May 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195398250.013.0016

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

The Online World, the Internet, Social Class, and Counseling

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  • Psychology
  • Counselling Psychology
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The Internet has transformed the day-to-day experience of many individuals across cultural divides and socioeconomic backgrounds, creating new opportunities, resources, relationships, and communities, yet not everyone has equal access. This chapter provides an overview of some of the implications of the digital divide for the counseling field and examples of ways the Internet has revolutionized access to counseling or mental health–related information and care. Through the realms of online counseling, community intervention, and online research, this chapter examines the direct relevance of using the Internet for the practice of counseling psychology. Counseling psychologists must address the continuing disparities in levels of technology access and skills in using online resources—disparities that create distance and disconnection between people from different social class backgrounds. As a case example, GenerationPulse highlights the potential benefits of the Internet and possible ways to overcome challenges like relational disconnection. Recommendations for practitioners and researchers follow.

Keywords: Internet; online counseling; community intervention; online research

Article.  9302 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Counselling Psychology ; Psychological Assessment and Testing ; Developmental Psychology

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