Article

Social Rejection Reduces Intelligent Thought and Self-Regulation

Tyler F. Stillman and Roy F. Baumeister

in The Oxford Handbook of Social Exclusion

Published in print February 2013 | ISBN: 9780195398700
Published online April 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195398700.013.0013

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 Social Rejection Reduces Intelligent Thought and Self-Regulation

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This chapter reviews evidence that social rejection reduces intelligent thought and self-regulation. Correlational research has demonstrated that social rejection and low intellectual performance are related, as loneliness is associated with poor cognitive functioning. Experimental research has shed light on the correlational findings, as participants assigned to be rejected performed slowly and inaccurately on reasoning problems relative to participants assigned to control conditions. Hence, social rejection reduces intelligent thought. Evidence also indicates that rejection reduces self-control, as people who are rejected perform poorly on a wealth of self-control tasks.

Keywords: intelligence; ostracism; self-control; self-regulation; social rejection

Article.  5811 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Social Psychology ; Clinical Psychology

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