Thinking across the boundaries: psycholinguistic perspectives

Merrill Garrett

Published in print August 2007 | ISBN: 9780198568971
Published online September 2012 | | DOI:
Thinking across the boundaries: psycholinguistic perspectives

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience



This article claims that two things will bulk large in the historical scene. One is the importation of brain and biology into cognitive science in general and psycholinguistics in particular. The other is more subtle, but equally significant: the embedding of language in more general theories of mind. There is a reawakening of interest in the evolutionary underpinnings of language and other characteristically human features of cognition; an interest obviously confounded with the increased emphasis on the neuroscience of language and cognition. One might roughly describe the changes in practices and attitudes toward psycholinguistic problems in terms of three periods: 1955–1970: shaking the shackles of behaviorism and establishing the field; 1970–1990: exploring the fundamental problems and finding new directions; 1990s–: building cognitive science and investing in new methods. The article also looks at the state of current research and some probable future directions in several areas, including lexical processing, speech perception, developmental psycholinguistics, parsing, connectionism, cross-linguistic emphasis, language production, bilingualism, and the neuropathologies and biology of language.

Keywords: brain; biology; cognitive science; psycholinguistics; cognition; neuroscience; language; parsing; connectionism; speech perception

Article.  11048 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Cognitive Neuroscience

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »