Article

Reclaiming the cognitive unconscious: integrating hypnotic methods and cognitive-behavioral therapy

Joseph Barber

in The Oxford Handbook of Hypnosis

Published in print March 2008 | ISBN: 9780198570097
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780198570097.013.0017

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

Reclaiming the cognitive unconscious: integrating hypnotic methods and cognitive-behavioral therapy

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Compared with other psychological methods, clinicians and patients alike often have expected hypnotic treatment to be magical in its effect. The hypnotic methods have been believed to be curative of virtually all psychological ills and a variety of medical ailments. This article states that with the advent of the Internet, the capacity to spread such believes has grown suddenly and enormously. Persuaded by the claims of advertisements and popular literature, the general public has developed expectations that hypnosis can achieve almost anything. A further influence on the unrealistic expectation of the hypnotic effect is the use of hypnotic methods by those who are otherwise not clinically trained. This article explores the larger context in which hypnotic methods are used in psychotherapy. However, it states that the experience of hypnosis may serve to heighten the patient's focus and concentrate attention on the therapeutic experience.

Keywords: medical ailments; psychotherapeutic treatment; cognitive-behavioral therapy; psychotherapy; medical syndromes

Article.  5624 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology

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