Hall's chronicle and the Mirror for Magistrates

Scott Lucas

in The Oxford Handbook of Tudor Literature

Published in print September 2009 | ISBN: 9780199205882
Published online September 2012 | | DOI:

Series: Oxford Handbooks of Literature

Hall's chronicle and the Mirror for Magistrates

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Literature
  • Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)



Edward Hall's chronicle, The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Families of Lancaster and York (1548), and the historical verse tragedy compilation A Mirror for Magistrates (various editions from 1554) are two of the Tudor period's most remarkable literary success stories. Hall's chronicle served as a chief inspiration for the authors of A Mirror for Magistrates, who employed it not only as a primary source of information for their own historical verse narratives but also as a model for understanding the most important political tragedies of their own time, tragedies which they dared to confront and to protest by means of the allusive material and topically applicable exemplary narratives included in many of their poems. In great measure, Hall's chronicle set the tragic pattern for interpreting and representing English politics adopted by the Mirror authors for their collection. In turn, the compelling nature of both Hall's approach to English history and the emotionally powerful de casibus tragedy form of the Mirror ensured that this pattern would remain influential upon later generations of English poets and playwrights as they created new literary engagements with England's past.

Keywords: Edward Hall; historical verse narratives; political tragedy; English politics; English history

Article.  8073 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »