Article

Jonathan Edwards and Eighteenth‐Century Religious Philosophy

Roger A. Ward

in The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy

Published in print September 2008 | ISBN: 9780199219315
Published online September 2009 | e-ISBN: 9780198614128 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199219315.003.0001

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Philosophy

 Jonathan Edwards and Eighteenth‐Century Religious Philosophy

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Reading Edwards as a philosopher is daunting. Because he quotes few of his sources, and the complexity and volume of his writing is overwhelming, it is easy to discount Jonathan Edwards's connection to human problems. His human side appears in experiences like his youthful struggle with Calvinism and the ‘horrible doctrine’ of God's judgment and a conflict with his parents, probably about his status for communion. He did not meet his father's strict standards. Later he was confronted by the position of his grandfather Solomon Stoddard, who opened access to communion widely as a ‘means of conversion’. In this confused setting Edwards engages his deepest theological and philosophical questions.

Keywords: Jonathan Edwards; Calvinism; human problems; religious philosophy; theological question; horrible doctrine

Article.  7174 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; History of Western Philosophy ; Philosophy of Religion

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