Article

Liberal Equality: What, Where, and Why

Kok‐Chor Tan

in The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy

Published in print September 2008 | ISBN: 9780199219315
Published online September 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199219315.003.0023

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Philosophy

 Liberal Equality: What, Where, and Why

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  • Philosophy
  • History of Western Philosophy
  • Social and Political Philosophy

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In contemporary American philosophy, liberalism, as opposed to libertarianism, or classical liberalism, is understood to have an egalitarian distributive commitment. That is, in addition to the protection of the basic liberties of persons, liberal justice serves also to regulate social and economic inequalities between them. It is with this economic aspect of liberal equality that this article is concerned, rather than liberal equality in the more general and abstract sense of equal concern for persons. The article focuses on the internal debate; specifically, it surveys three fundamental questions of liberal equality that have received considerable attention in the literature.

Keywords: American philosophy; liberalism; liberal equality; distributive commitment; economic inequalities; social inequalities

Article.  15261 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; History of Western Philosophy ; Social and Political Philosophy

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