Article

Changing Competition Models in Market Economies: The Effects of Inter‐nationalization, Technological Innovations, and Academic Expansion on the Conditions Supporting Dominant Economic Logics

Richard Whitley

in The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Institutional Analysis

Published in print April 2010 | ISBN: 9780199233762
Published online May 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199233762.003.0014

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Business and Management

 Changing Competition Models in Market Economies: The Effects of Inter‐nationalization, Technological Innovations, and Academic Expansion on the Conditions Supporting Dominant Economic Logics

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This article distinguishes between the major competitive approaches adopted by leading firms in the OECD economies in the post-war period and outlines a framework for analysing how some of the key changes in the business environment since the collapse of the Bretton Woods system have affected the conditions encouraging companies to pursue these in different contexts. It presents a taxonomy of seven ideal types of competition models that resemble many of the dominant business strategies identified in comparative studies of twentieth-century capitalisms. The article also suggests how different kinds of conditions seem likely to encourage firms to follow particular types. Next, it summarizes the major changes that have taken place in many market economies since the 1960s which have often been cited as important factors influencing institutional and business system restructuring, and indicates how they can be expected to alter these conditions, and so affect dominant competition models in different economies.

Keywords: post-war period; Bretton Woods; business strategies; capitalisms; market economies; business system

Article.  15013 words. 

Subjects: Business and Management ; Business History ; Business Ethics

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