Article

Institutional Competitiveness: How Nations came to Compete

Ove Kaj Pedersen

in The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Institutional Analysis

Published in print April 2010 | ISBN: 9780199233762
Published online May 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199233762.003.0023

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Business and Management

Institutional Competitiveness: How Nations came to Compete

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Business and Management
  • International Business
  • Organizational Theory and Behaviour

GO

Preview

This article describes how policymakers and governments came to understand the role of institutions in shaping the growth trajectory of nations and later to act as if nations compete on the basis of their economic, political, and cultural institutions. It covers the period from the 1970s onwards. The article describes how the concept of international competitiveness has been redefined and advanced to become a discourse, using literature from economic theory and business analysis to do so. It is in this context that the concept of institutional competitiveness (CIC) is introduced as a particular understanding of what makes national economies competitive. Finally, the article emphasizes how state–society relations have been changed. The concept of ‘Competitive Arrangements’ is engaged with other related concepts. In conclusion, the CIC is defined and presented as a present understanding of international competitiveness among national governments and others.

Keywords: policymakers; governments; cultural institutions; institutional competitiveness; state–society relations

Article.  15259 words. 

Subjects: Business and Management ; International Business ; Organizational Theory and Behaviour

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »