Article

Concepts of Emotions in Modern Philosophy and Psychology

John Deigh

in The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion

Published in print December 2009 | ISBN: 9780199235018
Published online January 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199235018.003.0002

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Philosophy

 Concepts of Emotions in Modern Philosophy and Psychology

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Two major themes characterize the study of emotions in modern philosophy and psychology. One is the identification of emotions with feelings. The other is the treatment of emotions as intentional states of mind, that is, states of mind that are directed at or toward some object. Each theme corresponds to a different concept of emotions. Accordingly, the study has divided, for the most part, into two main lines of investigation. On one, emotions are conceived of as principally affective states. The concept on which this line proceeds is feeling-centered. On the other, emotions are conceived of as principally cognitive states. The concept on which this line proceeds is thought-centered. Both concepts reflect revolutionary changes in the theoretical study of emotions that began to take place at the end of the nineteenth century and continued for several decades into the twentieth.

Keywords: modern philosophy; concept of emotion; modern psychology; cognitive states; theoretical study; feelings

Article.  11544 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; Philosophy of Mind

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