Article

Intellectual and Other Nonstandard Emotions

Michael Stocker

in The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion

Published in print December 2009 | ISBN: 9780199235018
Published online January 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199235018.003.0019

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Philosophy

 Intellectual and Other Nonstandard Emotions

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To help characterize various emotions and to set the stage for discussion of them, it may help to mention some contrasts used by philosophers and other theorists in their discussions of emotions. The contrasts are doing and thinking; body and mind; activity and passivity; practical and theoretical; personal and interpersonal. These are important contrasts, but like many other contrasts they have often been misused in ways that hinder our understanding of emotions. This article intends to present several somewhat long passages of texts important for this work, presented in chronological order: the first by Aristotle, the second by William James, the third by Théodule Ribot, the fourth by two psychologists, both theorists of emotions, Nico H. Frijda and Louise Sundararajan. The main goals here are to show that intellectual and other nonstandard emotions are well known in our tradition; to show some of the variety they come in; and to begin to answer some questions and issues they raise.

Keywords: body and mind; activity and passivity; intellectual emotions; nonstandard emotions; Aristotle; William James

Article.  11866 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; Philosophy of Mind ; Moral Philosophy

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