Article

Language and Translation of the Old Testament

John Elwolde

in The Oxford Handbook of Biblical Studies

Published in print February 2008 | ISBN: 9780199237777
Published online September 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199237777.003.0009

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Religion and Theology

 Language and Translation of the Old Testament

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This article begins with a brief linguistic sketch of the Hebrew and Aramaic of the Bible. It then focuses on the inherent difficulty of ascertaining meaning in the Hebrew Bible (or, in the Christian tradition, the Old Testament, without the deutero-canonical, or apocryphal, books), from both a textual and a linguistic perspective. The lens through which the issue is viewed is mainly that of translations, in particular the most important of the ancient versions, the Old Greek (more loosely, the Septuagint, or LXX, much of which was completed in the late third and second centuries BCE), but also other ancient versions and modern translations.

Keywords: Hebrew; Aramaic; Bible; linguistics; translation

Article.  11233 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Religious Studies ; Judaism and Jewish Studies ; Christianity

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