Article

The President and Congressional Parties in an Era of Polarization

David W. Rohde and Meredith Barthelemy

in The Oxford Handbook of the American Presidency

Published in print August 2009 | ISBN: 9780199238859
Published online May 2010 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199238859.003.0013

Series: Oxford Handbooks of American Politics

 The President and Congressional Parties in an Era of Polarization

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This article describes a portion of the research on Congress and the president produced over the last two decades that relates to presidential party leadership. The main focus is on whether the theoretical arguments and empirical findings of that research apply to the polarized partisan era of the ‘Republican Revolution’ and the Bush presidency. It also concentrates on only a few aspects of the literature, particularly presidential success in the legislative process, the tendency to ‘go public’, and the consequences of divided government. Three aspects of presidential-congressional interaction are explained. A segment of the literature that is particularly relevant to this discussion involves the consequences of divided government. The implications of polarization are relevant to a large and important share of the political agenda.

Keywords: American president; Congress; partisan polarization; Republican Revolution; presidency; divided government; presidential party leadership

Article.  10514 words. 

Subjects: Politics ; US Politics ; Comparative Politics

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