Article

Authenticity in Art

Denis Dutton

in The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics

Published in print January 2005 | ISBN: 9780199279456
Published online September 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199279456.003.0014

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Philosophy

 Authenticity in Art

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Many of the most often-discussed issues of authenticity have centred around art forgery and plagiarism. A forgery is defined as a work of art whose history of production is misrepresented by someone (not necessarily the artist) to an audience (possibly to a potential buyer of the work), normally for financial gain. A forging artist paints or sculpts a work in the style of a famous artist in order to market the result as having been created by the famous artist. Exact copies of existing works are seldom forged, as they will be difficult to sell to knowledgeable buyers. The concept of forgery necessarily involves deceptive intentions on the part of the forger or the seller of the work: this distinguishes forgeries from innocent copies or merely erroneous attributions.

Keywords: authenticity; art forgery; plagiarism; innocent copies; deceptive intentions; expressive authenticity

Article.  7962 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy ; Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art ; Moral Philosophy

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